Mini Modular Madness!

As part of the celebration of 10 years of modular buildings, LEGO is giving you the chance to win the complete set of modular buildings.  Yep, every single one of them.  Essentially, you just need to build a mini modular scale version of one of your own modular buildings, that fits within the defined specs for the mini modular.

You’ll go mad  if you miss out on the opportunity to win every single modular building ever produced by LEGO!  So head over to Rebrick now to check out the competition details. (Or don’t, that’s OK by me!)

Hats off to Gabriele

The Hat Store by Gabriele Rava is one of those buildings with loads of street appeal that immediately draws your attention.  It is one of contrasts in terms of colours and details, with the darker, intricate details on the ground floor followed by the lighter middle floor with simpler detailing and then finished off by a bright colour for the top floor which again has more intricate detailing. Despite that (or is it because off that?), it all works really well together to create a striking building.

My favourite details are the windows on the ground floor and the trim at the roof line (the parts with the 1×1 plate with tooth).  The brick-built hats are neat too!

I also love the colours in this building.  While I wouldn’t have thought to put the yellow and dark orange together, it kind of makes sense when you think of it in terms of them being shades of one another, including the dark red in the awnings on the ground floor.

Head over to Flickr or Eurobricks for a closer look!

Thanks for sharing, Gabriele!

Architectural Showcase

Snaillad (Andrew Tate) has again shown us his exceptional design skills with the headquarters for the Astrid and Associates Architecture firm. The 1930’s building has been renovated inside and out to showcase the architectural firm’s skills.  Judging by the results, I expect they will have plenty of new clients to keep them busy!

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My favourite detail on the outside is the way that the ground floor windows on the left have been framed by the arches, followed by the tall window above the entrance.  The interior features a modern decor, with a funky meeting table and clever storage for all the architectural drawings.

Head over to the Flickr album for more shots of this beautiful building.

Thanks for the inspiration, Snaillad!

Naomi’s Place

I did a review of Heartlake Cupcake Cafe (41119) for Friends Bricks back in April 2016. At that time, I had a fairly clear vision of what the modular version would look like. It’s only taken 10 months to finally get around to turning the vision into an actual building!

I’ve called this one Naomi’s Place, since Naomi runs the cafe.

I loved the entrance for the Heartlake Cupcake Cafe, especially the stained glass window above the front door and the windows framed using the ornamental arches.  This section of the building was 16 studs wide and was therefore a natural starting point for the conversion to a modular building.  There was the matter of the gaps on the sides of the arches, but I filled those using a technique similar to that used by LEGO in the Winter Village Toy Shop (10199).

I also loved the outdoor seating area and was able to incorporate a similar structure in the rooftop terrace.  My daughter also decided that this was the perfect place for the rotating cake display.  So, while it lost the round windows, it didn’t lose the whole display!

The ground floor and rooftop are furnished with the fittings from the official model.  The first floor remain empty, but this could readily be converted to more seating (maybe move the couch there?) or the bakery / kitchen for the cafe.

You can find more images of Naomi’s Place on flickr and you can download the instructions for the structure here.

Pint-sized perfection

I don’t normally showcase other building scales, but I couldn’t go passed these Mini Modulars by de-marco.  The level of detail that de-marco has captured in these four buildings is awe-worthy.

de-marco Mini Modulars

My favourite is the bank, followed closely by the second from the left, which I’m guessing is a townhouse.  Although small in scale, de-marco has made the bank look like a grand building with an imposing entrance.  I also love the shop front on the bakery. What’s your favourite?

Head over to the Flickr album for a closer look at these pint-sized perfections!

Garage fit for a museum

carebear has created stunning corner modular building to provide a garage, storage area and general workshop for his museum.  The Garage features a striking facade and three fully furnished floors for parking museum vehicles, storing artefacts and museum staff to prepare, maintain and repair museum exhibits.

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One of my favourite details on this building is the way that the roof is done, especially the inclusion of the skylights and the use of the sloped grill pieces:

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The Garage is as beautifully done on the inside as it is on the outside, so make sure to check out the whole building in high-resolution on Brickshelf, and then head over to Eurobricks to join the conversation about this stunning building.

Thanks for the inspiration carebear!

Hitting the high notes

eliza-musicstoreEliza (Elizabeth Nevermind) has hit all the high notes with the four storey Music Store.

Dark Red and Dark Blusih Grey are one of my favourite combinations for modular buildings.  Eliza has taken this a step further, with depth in the facade created by the colour and texture variation in the brick work.

I love the details on the cornices, especially the use of the bow and arrow pieces and the 1×2 Technic bricks on their side.

Other details that caught my eye were the fire escape on the side of the building and the “Music” sign.

On the inside, the ground floor of the Music Store has a range of instruments on display.  My favourite details are the keyboards and the bongo drums.

Head over to Eliza’s Flickr photostream to see more images of the impressive Music Store.

Feral flora

Sebastian Zaberca shows us what happens when plants go bad, with the Botanical Institute being overtaken by carnivorous vines.

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Fortunately, the plants haven’t yet destroyed the property, so we still get to admire the beautiful building that houses the institute.

Thanks, as always, for the inspiration, Sebastian!